Shopping Cart

Call us: +1 (207) 364 1520

Free shipping to the lower 48 states on orders > $100  *T&Cs apply
«

 | 

Species

Already know what you're looking for?

Species Discovery Filters

Longhi

Longhi is an African wood with similar working properties to its more well-known cousin, Anegre. Its color varies from a greyish-white to beige to pinkish-brown color, which slightly darkens with age and UV-ray exposure. Its generally light appearance makes sapwood difficult to distinguish. Its grains are typical straight (though occasionally interlocked) and its texture ranges between fine and medium-fine. It can sometimes possess mottled or subtle tiger-striped figuring.

The wood must be carefully dried, as it is susceptible to fungus. It is considered to be moderately durable, and moderately stable. Longhi has a solid strength-to-weight ratio, which makes it a popular choice for flooring and decking.

Common Uses:
cabinetry, decking, flooring, furniture
Detail
Common Uses
longhi
Purpleheart

While renowned for its often deep, rich purple hues, Purpleheart is actually one of the toughest woods in the world. It is considered one of the stiffest, hardest woods — boasting an impressive strength-to-weight ratio. It is also extremely water resistant, which, combined with its toughness, has seen it frequently used in outdoor decking and even as truckbed flooring. The wood is typically straight or wavy grained (though sometimes irregular). Its texture ranges from fine to medium, and it has a nice natural luster that emerges when fine sanded. The wood works and turns well, although sharp tools and blades are a necessity. It glues and finishes well, also.

Common Uses:
boatbuilding, cabinetry, carving, decking, flooring, furniture, inlay, paneling, specialty items, turnings, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
purpleheart
Rosewood - African

African Rosewood is a species from the same genus as Bubinga (Guibourtia), which has led to Bubinga often mistakenly being referred to as “African Rosewood.” Though obviously not a true rosewood, it does often bear aesthetic similarities. The grain is generally straight but can be interlocked; its texture is moderately fine. The heartwood color ranges from pink to reddish-brown, with purple or red streaks / lines / highlights.

African Rosewood works well, although it can have a moderate blunting effect on tools. It glues and finishes well. It needs to be dried slowly and carefully, to prevent warping and cracking. It’s a durable wood and is considered stable, once dried.

Common Uses:
boatbuilding, decking, flooring, furniture, millwork, specialty items, turnings, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
rosewood-african
Ipe

Ipe is known throughout its indigenous Central & South American regions as an extremely dense, durable wood, but also one that is quite difficult to work. The wood encompasses a variety of different species of the Handroanthus genus, so aesthetics and grains patterns can vary dramatically. The wood can have a deep chocolate brown color with reddish tint, or sometimes a greenish tint accented by traces of green, yellow, orange and/or red color. Often, its aesthetics are enhanced by rugged, dark contrasting striping.

Grains can be straight, irregular or interlocked; straight-grained pieces plane and turn well, although cutting tools and blades should always be at their very sharpest. Its texture can range from fine to medium, and it generally has a good natural luster.

Common Uses:
construction, decking, flooring, handles, turnings, veneer
Detail
Common Uses
ipe
Cumaru

Cumaru or Brazilian Teak is golden brown in color. It is extremely stiff, strong, hard and highly durable and can be an excellent substitute for Ipe for decking due to superb durability and weathering properties. It can be difficult to work due to its density and interlocked grain.

Common Uses:
cabinetry, decking, flooring, furniture
Detail
Common Uses
cumaru
Cedar - Alaskan

Alaskan Cedar has been a wood historically embroiled in controversy with botanical and wood experts, as the wood has had its genus reclassified on six different occasions over the course of the last two centuries. Despite its relatively light weight and density, it is a very durable and rather versatile species — having seen duty in numerous indoor and outdoor applications. The wood has also become a popular choice with luthiers, for acoustic guitar soundboards.

Contrary to other published data, the typical growth range for these trees in the wild is only between 40 and 80 feet tall. Undisturbed specimens have reached heights of 100 feet and some have been reputed to be as old as 3500 years! Despite its modest weight and density figures, it is an extremely tough wood and these trees hold their own through some very challenging conditions. This makes Alaskan Cedar a very versatile wood, suitable for a wide variety of different applications.

Common Uses:
boatbuilding, boxmaking, carving, construction, decking, flooring, outdoor furniture
Detail
Common Uses
cedar-alaskan
0
    0
    Your Cart
    Your cart is emptyReturn to Shop