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  • Tamboti is a beautiful African hardwood which is derived from the Spirostachys Africana tree — a medium-sized, semi-deciduous to deciduous, fruit producing tree. The heartwood is brown to dark brown, with darker markings and streaks, clearly demarcated from the whitish to pale yellow sapwood. Its grains are usually straight to slightly wavy, with a fine, even texture. The wood has a beautiful banded figure and a satin-like lustre, with an oily surface. Known for its durability, dimensional stability and exceptional rot and insect resistance, Tamboti is a hard, heavy wood — and one which remains in steady demand throughout regions of its natural range, despite its somewhat challenging working properties.

    Between the tree’s natural oils and latex production, resawing the wood tends to gum up saw blades. Difficulties aside, the wood turns and finishes well, and its density and pleasant aesthetics make it popular with wood carvers, as well.

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    Sustainability: This species is not listed in the CITES Appendices, but is reported by the IUCN as being “data deficient.” Due to a recent history of exploitation, exporting has been restricted and is closely monitored in India and Sri Lanka.

    Common Uses: Decorative joinery, furniture, cabinetry, construction posts & beams, flooring, shipbuilding, musical instruments, carvings, turnings, small specialty items and fuelwood (although the fumes can be toxic).

    Comments: The tree is known for its toxic milky latex, that exudes from all parts of it. Its bark, roots and the latex have been utilized for centuries in concoctions used to treat a variety of medical issues. Despite its great popularity throughout southern Africa, its sawdust can be quite harmful to the eyes (even being reputed to cause blindness, in extreme cases of repeated exposure).

    Tamboti emits a fragrant, spicy smell when worked, and the smell can actually persist for years.

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  • Like all other members of the true maple genus (Acer), European Sycamore is a hardwood whose sapwood is greatly preferred and sought after, versus its heartwood. It sap can vary from an almost pure white to a light cream color with tinting ranging from a golden yellow to a muted red; heartwood is generally medium to dark reddish-brown colored. Grains are generally straight, but can be wavy. Combined with its fine texture, it is easy to work (although, like all maples, it can burn easily) — turning, gluing and finishing well, with a good natural luster. Not unlike its Acer-genus counterparts, pieces can sometimes be dramatically figured.

    Boards are typical found quartersawn, as European Sycamore is the lumber renowned for its preferential, and historical, use as a body wood for stringed orchestral instruments (violins, violas, etc.), possessing superb resonance qualities and full-spectrum frequency response at a very moderate weight.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    Common Uses: Veneer, musical instruments (specifically orchestral stringed-instrument bodies), architectural millwork, furniture, cabinetry, joinery, wood flooring and parquetry, utility wood, turnings and small specialty items.

    Comments: The Acer Pseudoplatanus tree has seen wide naturalization not only due to the wood’s highly desirable status as a tonewood, but, more generally, because of its wide natural canopy — making it ideally suited for use as a shade tree in public parks, bordering public streets and roads, on private residences and other such locations. Its seeds easily germinate and take root, so the tree has wound up becoming labeled an “invasive species,” “environmental weed” or “nuisance” in numerous areas scattered across both its indigenous and naturalized regions.

    As the wood ages, it typically does so by gravitating toward a more golden brown appearance. European Sycamore is a non-durable wood, so it is not well-suited for outdoor applications; some sort of tough, durable finish for products crafted from this wood is recommended.

    Lumber is also commonly utilized in Europe for architectural millwork, where the more white-colored boards are frequently used and highly coveted.

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  • Black Stinkwood has long been popular for use in fine furniture building in South Africa (where it is indigenous), due to its fine, tight, typically straight grains and a resolute durability that is often compared to Teak. It’s heartwood color can vary from almost black to dark brown, to more medium brown tones with a reddish tint; the sap is easily distinguished by its contrasting pale yellow coloration. Despite its inherent density, Stinkwood possesses very cooperative working properties. It has beautiful finishing characteristics and a rich natural luster.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, although the species has been classified as a “Protected Tree” in South Africa.

    Common Uses: Fine furniture, cabinetry, doors, decorative trim and gun stocks.

    Comments: Despite its humorous name — given for the horrid smell the trees put off when first cut — Stinkwood has remained a tremendously popular wood with South African fine furniture craftsmen, cabinet makers and gunsmiths, alike.

    The bark of the Ocotea Bullata tree has medicinal properties which, combined with the immense popularity of the tree’s timber in South Africa, has led to the species being effectively extinct in a number of scattered areas throughout its (original) natural range; the bark stripping has fatal consequences for the tree.

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  • Engelmann Spruce is typically a high-altitude mountain evergreen tree, indigenous to the mountainous regions of western North America, with scattered, isolated distribution in surrounding lower-level areas. The wood is prized among many acoustic guitar luthiers, for its superior resonance and tonal response qualities when used as a soundboard (acoustic guitar top). Its color can range from a light off-white to cream.

    It is straight grained and has a fine, consistent texture, which makes it generally easy to work — although common-grade pieces may contain numerous small knots, and the wood can be difficult to stain. Its excellent stiffness-to-weight ratio has made it historically useful in a variety of construction and utility applications, benefited, also, by a virtually limitless domestic supply.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices, and is reported by the IUCN as being “a species of least concern.”

    Common Uses: Acoustic guitar soundboards, harps, violins and pianos, construction lumber, sheathing, railroad ties, wood pulp / papermaking and also used in the Western US as Christmas trees.

    Comments: Although Engelmann Spruce is a fairly cheap, easily accessible lumber, clear instrument-grade, quartersawn billets can be very pricey — as small knots are quite common in the species, and such coveted clear pieces typically are derived from undisturbed specimens grown at higher altitudes.

    While Sitka Spruce remains a more heavily utilized wood for such acoustic guitar soundboard applications (being slightly stronger and heavier than Engelmann), there are a number of discriminating guitar builders who covet Engelmann. (By comparison, Sitka Spruce trees are far more massive in stature.) Due to this unique demand, premium-grade billets can command prices comparable with any of the most expensive domestic wood species.

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  • Nicaraguan Rosewood — also known as Yucatan Rosewood, or Panama Rosewood — is the least dense, hard and heavy of all the Dalbergia species. Its heartwood can vary from a pale yellow-brown, to tan, to varying shades of brown (both light and dark); sapwood is pale yellow and clearly demarcated. Grains are generally straight, but can be wavy or interlocked; its texture ranges from fine to medium, with large, open pores. Its moderate luster is in keeping with its reputation of being aesthetically bland, although darker accents and occasional figuring are sometimes present.

    Despite being significantly less stout than all of its true rosewood cousins, the wood is surprisingly durable. It is less oily, also, which adds up to some generally very cooperative working, turning, gluing and finishing properties.

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    Sustainability: This species is listed in CITES Appendix II, but is not listed on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species; part of the Dalbergia -genus worldwide exportation ban.

    Common Uses: Turned objects, musical instruments, furniture, and small specialty wood objects.

    Comments: The density, hardness and weight of this species can vary greatly, depending on the specific region and conditions of its growth.

    There has been some confusion and controversy surrounding its scientific name, as it is commonly referred to as “Dalbergia Yucatensis.”

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  • The Yellow Poplar (Liriodendron Tulipifera) tree is the tallest of all Eastern US hardwoods; the wood it yields is some of the least dense. Yellow Poplar is characterized by a light muted cream color, often with mineral-stained streaks typically of gray and/or green. (Sapwood is ivory- to white-colored, easily distinguished from the heartwood.) Although, traditionally, Poplar has been long considered a “utility” type of lumber, the wood’s straight, uniform grains and medium texture affords it very cooperative working properties, and it glues and finishes well when finely sanded.

    Yellow Poplar is moderately durable, in spite of its inherent light weight and low density, which has seen it commonly used for crates and pallets throughout the US.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    Common Uses: Veneer, paneling, musical instruments (specifically, electric guitar bodies), plywood, pulp (for paper production), crates, pallets, and other utility applications.

    Comments: The aesthetically desirable of Yellow Poplar boards is often referred to as “Rainbow Poplar;” so named for its muted mineral-stained color streaks, which truly span the rainbow. (… with red, orange, yellow, green, indigo, purple and black hues all possibly present and not uncommon.)

    It is interesting to note that the tree is not actually a true Poplar (of the Populus genus), is a member of the Liriodendron genus. Liriodendron is Latin for ?lily tree.? After the tree buds, its flowers have a simlar hourglass shape to that of tulips — earning it the other common name by which its known of “Tulip Poplar.”

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  • Pau Rosa is a very beautiful tropical wood. Depending on the specific region of the trees’ growth, colors can vary from a medium chocolate brown to an almost Padauk-like red or orange, or even a mixture of such colors which can also include yellows and purples (also like Padauk). It is a very dense wood, with grains which are typically wavy or interlocked, and moderately course. Despite its density, it is considered relatively easy to work and turns, glues and finishes well.

    Drying the wood is a slow, burdenous process. Like many woods which are comparably hard, logs and boards have a tendency to crack while drying, although Pau Rosa is considered very durable and dimensionally stable, there after.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices; categorized on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species as a species of “least concern.”

    Common Uses: Carpentry, furniture, veneer, fuelwood, interior & exterior utility, carvings, turnings and various small specialty items.

    Comments: Pau Rosa is not commonly found outside of Africa. Due to the combination of its cracking tendencies (when drying) and the relative short, squatty profile of most trees, long boards are even more uncommon. The wood has a nice natural luster. Its density and somewhat coarse texture requires sharp blades, but — despite its coarseness and typically interlocked grains — it actually planes well.

    Due to its very limited supply, Pau Rosa is not too well-known in the US. It has excellent tonal properties, despite being grossly overlooked and under-appreciated.

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  • Panga Panga is the first cousin to Africa’s more popular and well-known exotic, Wenge (with both trees being of the Millettia genus) — sharing a similar large pored, course texture, and presenting some of the same challenges when working. It is generally a bit lighter colored, with heartwood ranging from the lighter to darkers sides of medium brown, with dark brown to black streaks and/or highlighted grain lines. Darker examples can be easily confused with Wenge, and they have been known to turn almost black as they age.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    Common Uses: Hardwood flooring, veneer, paneling, trim, fine furniture, musical instruments, turnings and small specialty items.

    Comments: If someone in the US were to take possession of this wood and resell it as Wenge, it certainly wouldn’t be the first time. Panga Panga is more well known on the international market than in the US, and it remains a popular (and expensive) choice for parquee flooring throughout the UK and Europe.

    There are the same inflammatory issues associated with its splinters. Sharing these same characteristics and propensities as its notorious cousin, carefully attention and proper precautions should be taken when working and handling it.

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  • This is an oak hardwood species not often seen or found in great abundance outside of Western & Southwestern Europe. It is perhaps best noted for its use in the manufacture of wine barrels; the wood is said to have a mellowing effect on the taste and texture of wines which are aged in the barrels. (It is an historical favorite among Italian wine producers.) Its heartwood is a light to medium brown, sometimes with a greenish hue. Its grains are generally straight (although sometimes interlocked or irregular), but its texture is coarse and uneven.

    Like many other oaks, quartersawn pieces will typically display fleck ray patterns. Although not as dense as White Oak, it is also very responsive to steam bending, and is a tough durable wood. It, too, is easy to work, and glues, stains and finishes well.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    Common Uses: Wine barrels, cabinetry, furniture, interior trim, flooring, boatbuilding, and veneer.

    Comments: Hardly ever seen here, this is an oak that remains in short supply in the US. It is a tough, versatile wood, and its renown in the wine industry dates back many centuries. Quartersawn pieces, again, provide maximum stability for this species, and their fleck figuring can be quite dramatic.

     

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  • Silky Oak is not a true Quercus-genus species, although it can exhibit a similar appearance; it is renowned for its dense “rays” and sometime flecked figuring. (Quartersawn pieces can be very dramatic.) It has a light to medium reddish-brown hue, with contrasting rays that are slightly darker can range anywhere from a muted brown to gray color. Despite being more durable than any American oak species, its draw is its aesthetic qualities. Because of its course texture — with quartersawn surfaces being littered with Lacewood-like flecks — Silky Oak can prove to difficult to plane. Once you’re passed that, it is generally easy to work, and glues and finishes well.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    Common Uses: Veneer, cabinetry, fine furniture, musical instruments, turned objects, and other small specialty items.

    Comments: This wood is easily misidentified as “Lacewood;” their aesthetics and densities are generally quite similar. The wood is not particularly well known in the US, as exports have been sporadic and, thus, supplies are quite limited.

    Being of the Grevillea genus, the wood is not actually related to any true Oak (genus: Quercus) species; it is actually a fast-growing evergreen tree.

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  • Nogal — also commonly known as “Peruvian Walnut” — is a dark chocolate-colored walnut which often contains black lines and streaks and can sometimes be tinted (in this case, usually purple, when found). Not unlike its American cousin, Black Walnut, it typically has straight grain patterns (which can also occasionally be irregular), a medium to course texture and a good natural luster.

    Despite these aesthetic similarities, it is much less common to find figuring in Nogal than in Black Walnut. It is generally considered very easy to work, stain, finish and glue, although irregular-grained boards can experience tearout issues when planed.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices, however Juglans Neotropica is classified as “Endangered” on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    Common Uses: Furniture, cabinetry, veneer, flooring, musical instruments, and interior trim.

    Comments: “Peruvian Walnut” is the name given to a variety of true Walnut (Juglans) species which grow throughout Central & South America. The wood is typically darker than American Black Walnut, although it has a very similar density and working properties.

    While being moderately durable, its applications are typically confined to ‘indoor,’ as it can make an inviting target for bugs and insects.

    The wood is notorious for being slow to dry. It must be slowly and carefully air dried, prior to kiln drying. Logs are usually cut into boards of 4/4 thickness, for faster, more consistent drying. Thicker pieces have proven problematic with the irreegular occurance of wet zones — which can lead to “honeycombing,” or even internal collapse.

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  • Indigenous to the southern region of Africa, the Mopane tree is known for its butterfly-shaped leaves — leaves which are initially a bright green color, later transforming into a cache of reds, oranges, and yellows, in the autumn season. The heartwood it produces is medium to darker brown in color, with a golden to reddish tint, often decorated with black streaks. It is very dense and extremely durable. It is also very resistance to infestation, which has seen it used for centuries in its native region in a variety of outdoor uses.

    The wood is considered very difficult to work, as — in addition to its great density — its grain patterns are usually interlocked. It turns smoothly and (as would be expected) holds details very well, making it popular with turners and carvers who know of it.

    We stock roots, but the details we provide are for the timber.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    Common Uses: Flooring, furniture, musical instruments, turned objects, carvings, fuelwood/charcoal, fencing, exterior construction and other outdoor utility applications.

    Comments: Despite being one of the most dense, stable and durable woods on the planet, Mopane remains one of Africa’s best-kept secrets. It has been used for centuries there for carved woodwind instruments, and is considered to have excellent tonal properties, similar to African Blackwood.
    Large boards are rare and difficult to obtain; trees tend to branch out to great widths, yielding irregular-shaped, trunks, and at full maturity

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  • The term “Soft Maple” is not a reference to any particular maples species, per se, but a segment of the Acer genus known for its lighter weight and density (as well as its propensity for displaying the classic maple “curl” figure). Of these lighter maples, Red Maple has the most weight and density, and is also the most prevalent — growing in areas scattered all over the Eastern US and up into (Eastern) Canada. As is the paradoxical case with all maples, its beautiful pale white / pale yellow / pale golden sapwood are more coveted than its darker heartwood.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    Common Uses: Veneer, paper, boxes, utility wood, musical instruments, turned objects, and other small specialty wood items.

    Comments: Its more heavy, dense nature lends Red Maple to a greater variety of utility applications, versus its less substantial Soft Maple cousins. Its figuring can be quite dramatic; tiger-striped, veined, fiddleback and sometimes even quilt figuring are sometimes present.

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  • Maple is the only American wood species harvested primarily for its sapwood, rather than heartwood. Since the beginning of mass commercial production of the electric guitar, in the early 1950’s, Hard Maple has remained a pivotal lumber in the industry. It comes in a variety of figures — including Birdseye and Tiger Maple figurings — and its soft pale white to pale yellow complexion is sometimes augmented by light blue, red or pinkish tints and highlights, with a marvelous luster and often a luxurious sheen.

    Its excellent strength-to-weight ratio, handsome looks, easy workability and steady supply has cemented Maple as a part of both American industry and culture. Despite its ready availability, premium-grade boards always command high prices and remain in constant demand, worldwide.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    Common Uses: Commercial & residential flooring, veneer, musical instruments, furniture, cabinetry, turned objects, carvings, interior utility wood applications and miscellaneous wood specialty items.

    Comments: For more than a century, Hard Maple has remained the preferred choice for commercial flooring in the US for applications — such as gymnasiums, bowling alleys, dance halls and any more — where light-color, strength and toughness are requisite qualities. It is the strongest and densest of all the commercial maple species.

    Its trees are also known as “Sugar Maple,” being the primary species tapped for maple syrup.

    Use caution, be slow and patient, and pay careful attention when cutting or sanding any maple species with high-RPM machinery, as its surface can burn.

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  • Ambrosia Maple is a general term attached to a variety of Acer (true maple) species whose boards included colorful bug “trails” — caused by a fungus carried by the Ambrosia Beetle which penetrates the tree sap as the beetle eats into the tree, and it spreads both through the worm hole and up and down in the tree (carried along by the sap) and causes discoloring of the wood in streaks. The two primary species which draw the beetle’s attention are Acer Rubrum (Red Maple) and Acer Saccharum (Sugar Maple), although — with there reputedly being more than sixty different Acer species indigienous to North America — this unusual phenomenon is certainly not confined to just the two. Weight and density can vary greatly — depending upon the actual species — the typical varieties of maple figuring can also be present, often creating some very unique, visually spectacular specimens.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    Common Uses: Veneer, furniture, crafts, guitar tops and bodies, turned objects, and other small specialty wood items.

    Comments: Like any other maple, it is easily worked; generally cooperative through all phases. It’s not much of a stretch to imagine — since bugs have, quite obviously, already penetrated the wood’s surface — that the wood is decidedly non-durable, although it is generally stable enough for use in furniture and guitars. It’s surface is typically darker than most sap maple (often featuring secondary / additional discolorations and other long streaks), although it retains the same high degree of natural luster.

    The scientific explanation is that the impregnated Ambrosia Beetle burrows into the maple tree (presumably for a safe place to deposit larvae), carrying fungi on its feet into the wood — which serves as food for the insect’s offspring, when they hatch. The fungal residue left behind as it digs into the maple can cause discoloration throughout the wood, via the tree’s sap, in addition to the dramatically contrasting (mostly) blue and (sometimes) green trails which surround the small tunnels they chew. The beetles prefer wood that is not soaking wet, but that is in the beginning stages of drying. Once kiln dried, they will not reinfest.

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  • Although not a true (Swietenia-genus) mahogany, Santos Mahogany exhibits a lot of the same aesthetic characteristics. The heartwood ranges from a muted yellow-orange to (more commonly) a deep red in color. Pieces which feature dramatic figuring and chatoyance, like its namesake, are not uncommon, either. Its visual similarities are where the comparisons end, as the wood is considerably heavier and generally around twice as dense and hard as a typical true mahogany species.

    Its grains are typically interlocked (though sometimes straight), making it difficult to work. The wood has a high natural oil content, which can make it difficult to glue but gives it a beautiful luster and renders an excellent finish. Its texture is typically not as fine as mahogany, shading more towards the ‘medium’ portion of the scale.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. (… considered to be a species of ‘least concern’ to CITES, presently.)

    Common Uses: Flooring, furniture, interior trim, veneer and heavy construction.

    Comments: Its tough, very durable nature makes it a natural choice for more demanding applications, such as flooring — where it remains a popular choice in the US. Unlike true mahoganies, this wood can be difficult to work — having a blunting effect on blades and cutting tools, with its noted density, oily nature and interlocked grains.

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  • Louro Preto is closely related to Bocote and Ziricote, also being a Central / South American wood whose species are in the Cordia genus. Its heartwood is typically a medium brown color, with both red and green tints common. The sap is easily discerned, being of a pale coloration with a base that’s usually a muted yellowish hue. The wood is known to darken, considerably, with repeated UV-ray exposure. Compared with either of its aforementioned Cordia counterparts, Louro Preto is generally pretty tame in its grain patterns (which are usually either straight-grained or somewhat irregular).

    It has a texture that ranges from fine to medium, and has the impressive natural luster associated with the genus.

    Despite also sharing their propensity for high natural oil content, the wood usually glues well. It is known to be easy to work, although some examples may contain varying amounts of silica.

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    Sustainability: Not currently listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    Common Uses: Furniture, cabinetry, veneer, and turned objects.

    Comments: Louro Preto has always been greatly overshadowed by Bocote and Ziricote in terms of popularity and demand, despite being a rather handsome wood. It’s very easy to work, it finishes well and has an impressive natural luster that emerges when sanded. Its pleasant appearance can sometimes be augmented by bold, dark brown lines and streaks.

    Because of a general lack of demand in the US, its supply has consistently been a limited one.

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  • Without question, one of the world’s hardest, most dense woods, Argentinian Lignum Vitae is very similar to its namesake — the world’s most dense wood, genuine Lignum Vitae — in appearance, working properties and physical characteristics. (Both are classified in the same scientific family, Zygophyllaceae.) It is a beautiful wood, with heartwood colors ranging from medium to dark brown, quite often featuring green highlights (sometimes in a prominent fashion) which become more pronounced as the wood ages and is increasingly exposed to UV rays. Sapwood is pale yellow. Its grains can be straight, wavy or slightly interlocked, and it has a smooth, consistent texture and an impressive natural luster that emerges with fine-grit sanding.

    While its dense, hard, heavy physical nature makes it rough on blades and sometimes difficult to glue, it turns very smoothly and is extremely stable and durable.

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    Sustainability: This wood species is in CITES Appendix II, and is on the IUCN Red List as “Conservation Dependent.”

    Common Uses: Tool handles, mallet heads, bearings, bushings, boatbuilding, pulley wheels, utility outdoor applications, heavy construction (in local indigneous regions), and turned objects.

    Comments: When (genuine) Lignum Vitae first made it onto CITES’ Appendix II list, Verawood became more well known and popular — commonly used as a substitute. Now that it, too, has made it onto both CITES and the IUCN’s radar, it is not an easy wood to access in the US, either.

    Despite the difficulties it poses with planing and resawing, Argentinian Lignum is a great wood for any outdoor applications: it is virtually rot-proof, and insect-proof.

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  • Hawaiian Koa is generally medium brown to reddish brown in color, but color can vary quite a lot.? It is a very popular musical instrument wood that produces a rich, warm tone. As a result it is used a lot in guitars and ukuleles.

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    Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices, and is reported by the IUCN as being a species of least concern

    Common Uses: Veneers, musical instruments, gun & knife handles, turned objects, and specialty items.

    Comments: Koa is considered to be one of Hawaii?s most attractive native hardwoods. It has been compared to Mahogany in appearance by some. It is quite dimensionally stable and fairly easy to work except when the pieces are highly figured or have heavily interlocked grains.

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  • Desert Ironwood (Palo Fierro in Spanish) only grows in the Sonoran Desert in Southwestern Arizona and the Northwestern part of Mexico.? It is one of the hardest and densest woods in the world. It ranges massively in color and can have some stunning figures as a result.

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    Sustainability: Not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.? However, Desert Ironwood (known as Palo Fierro in Spanish) is considered a protected species in Mexico due to overexploitation and diminishing natural habitat.

    Common Uses: Knife hands, carvings, turning

    Comments: A very difficult timber to work with due to its density, but it does turn, polish and finish well.

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